Series S 87 - Saskatchewan Assistance Plan Case Files series

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Saskatchewan Assistance Plan Case Files series

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  • Textual record

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S 87

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Date(s)

  • 1980 - 1982 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services. Regional Services Division
  • 1979 - 1980 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services. Income Support and Employment Services Division
  • 1978 - 1979 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services. Income Security Branch
  • 1974 - 1979 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Northern Saskatchewan. Social Services Branch
  • 1972 - 1979 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Northern Saskatchewan
  • 1972 - 1982 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services
  • 1972 - 1978 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services. Social Services Division
  • 1968 - 1972 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare. Operations Division
  • 1965 - 1968 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare. Public Assistance Branch
  • 1954 - 1965 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation. Public Assistance Branch, 1954-1965
  • 1954 - 1965 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation

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0.650 m of textual records

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Name of creator

(1949-1965)

Administrative history

The Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation was established on April 1, 1949 upon the amalgamation of the Department of Social Welfare and the Department of Reconstruction and Rehabilitation. At its establishment, the department was organized into the following branches and divisions: Child Welfare Branch; Corrections Branch; Old Age Pensions Branch; Social Aid Branch; Veterans' Rehabilitation Branch; Welfare Services Division; Administration Division; Home for the Infirm; and Regina Nursing Home.

The Child Welfare Branch provided programs and services that assisted disadvantaged children and families, and included protection, adoption, foster care, the education of blind children, and assistance for unmarried parents.

The Corrections Branch managed and operated the province's jails. As well, it provided programs and services aimed at the rehabilitation of offenders. Other responsibilities of the branch included the Industrial School for Boys (renamed the Saskatchewan Boys' School in 1950) along with parole and probation programs.

The Old Age Pensions Branch administered pensions to the aged and blind, and recovered pensions from the estates of deceased pensioners. The Social Aid Branch administered resources to persons needing financial assistance or rehabilitation. Services offered included social assistance, mothers' allowances, and vocational training for the disabled and minority groups. In the 1950-51 fiscal year, the Old Age Pensions Branch and the Social Aid Branch amalgamated to become the Public Assistance Branch.

The Veterans' Rehabilitation Branch was responsible for the settlement of veterans on Crown lands, for the annual inspection of lands settled by veterans and for the administration of the land clearance project in the Carrot River area.

The Welfare Services Division (by 1951, Branch) was comprised of field staff to deliver the services offered by the department from regional offices and inspection districts throughout the province.

The Administration Division was responsible for the financial and administrative functions of the department, such as accounting, institutional purchasing, personnel, and transportation and housing services for staff.

Institutions managed and operated by the department included the Home for the Infirm at Wolseley and the Regina Nursing Home, both of which provided residence and care to the aged and infirm.

In 1951, the department underwent reorganization which resulted in the establishment of a Research and Planning Branch, Housing and Nursing Homes Branch, Rehabilitation Branch, Public Welfare Branch, and Civil Defence Branch.

The Research and Planning Branch was created to act as a research agency that collected and analyzed research on the operations of the department's various programs. It also provided facilities to the department's branches for research projects.

The Housing and Nursing Homes Branch incorporated all programs, services and institutions offering residence and care to the aged and infirm. It also administered programs related to the National Housing Act, in particular the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation.

The Rehabilitation Branch was established to administer programs that assisted the disabled and minority groups in the province. Programs included vocational training and Métis farm labour projects.

The Public Welfare Branch was an amalgamation of the former Public Assistance, Child Welfare and Welfare Services Branches and provided programs and services offered by the former branches.

The Civil Defence Branch provided emergency response and assistance to natural and man-made disasters. In addition to disaster planning, it also offered training programs in disaster response and civil defence. The Civil Defence Branch was discontinued in April 1961 when its responsibilities were transferred to the newly-established Saskatchewan Emergency Measures which reported to Executive Council. Responsibility for emergency measures and planning was transferred back to the department in November 1962 and the Emergency Welfare Services Branch was established.

The Bureau on Alcoholism was created in November 1953. It administered programs that offered education and treatment to persons afflicted with alcoholism. The Bureau also conducted research into alcoholism and its treatment.

The Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation was discontinued on April 30, 1965 with the establishment of the Department of Welfare.

Name of creator

(1954-1965)

Administrative history

The Public Assistance Branch of the Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation was established in 1954 as a result of departmental reorganization. The branch was responsible for the administration of: The Social Aid Act ;The Old Age Assistance Act; The Blind Persons' Allowances Act; The Disabled Persons' Allowances Act, 1954; The Deserted Wives' and Children's Maintenance Act, 1950; and The Mothers' Allowance Regulations. Programs provided by the division were: social aid; supplemental allowances to old age security pensioners and blind persons; mothers' allowances; old age assistance; disabled and blind persons' allowances; and deserted wives and children's support.

The social aid program was administered jointly by the branch and by municipalities throughout Saskatchewan. Assistance was offered to clients based on a "needs test" evaluation system which ensured that clients
were receiving assistance appropriate to their needs. In addition to the program's long-term financial assistance, short-term housing and access to health services were offered to transients. In Regina, Saskatoon and Prince Albert, the Salvation Army collaborated with the branch and the respective municipalities in the provision of these services. Supplemental allowances were offered through the branch to old age security pensioners and to blind persons who required additional financial assistance. Allowance programs were administered by the branch to mothers, blind and disabled persons and to residents 65 years or older. The allowances were typically a fixed amount offered to qualifying residents on a monthly basis. By 1962, the mothers' allowance program was changed to focus on dependent families. The branch also provided services to deserted wives and children by administrating maintenance orders for support of children where support or payments were not granted to the wives.

The Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation was discontinued on April 30, 1965 with the establishment of the Department of Welfare. Responsibility for public assistance programs and services was assumed by the Public Assistance Branch of the new department.

Name of creator

(1965-1968)

Administrative history

The Public Assistance Branch of the Department of Welfare was established in 1965. The branch was responsible for the administration of: The Social Aid Act (replaced by The Saskatchewan Assistance Act, 1966); The Old Age Assistance Act; The Blind Persons' Allowances Act; The Disabled Persons' Allowances Act; and The Deserted Wives' and Children's Maintenance Act. At its establishment, programs provided by the division were: social aid; supplemental allowances to old age security pensioners and blind persons; dependent families allowances; old age assistance; disabled and blind persons' allowances; and deserted wives and children's support.

On April 1, 1966, the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan (SAP) was introduced under authority of the new Saskatchewan Assistance Act, 1966 and the Saskatchewan Assistance Regulations. The SAP replaced the former social aid program and assumed responsibility for the former allowance programs. This, coupled with changes to federal public assistance programs, allowed the branch to streamline public assistance into a single program for the provision of assistance for all persons in need. Funding for the SAP continued to be provided by the federal, provincial and municipal governments, with the SAP assuming responsibility for the administration of public assistance from municipalities in the province. Legislation, however, allowed for qualified municipalities to continue the administration of the assistance programs. The Cities of Moose Jaw and Prince Albert (and their related Rural Municipalities) chose to administer their own programs. In locations where municipalities did not participate, the program was administered from regional offices throughout the province. The SAP aimed at providing a more holistic approach to assisting residents in need by providing medical, psychological and vocational assessments and counselling to recipients and members of their families in addition to financial assistance.

In accordance with Section 17 of The Saskatchewan Assistance Act, the Provincial-Municipal Advisory Board was appointed in the 1966-1967 fiscal year. It was comprised of the deputy minister of the Department of Welfare, the director of the Public Assistance Branch, three representatives each of the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities and the Saskatchewan Urban Municipalities Association, one representative each from the Departments of Public Health and Municipal Affairs and a community representative. The Board advised on issues related to the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan, including the distribution of public assistance funds to the Plan's recipients. Local appeal committees were also established to adjudicate appeals of dissatisfied SAP recipients.

As a result of departmental reorganization in 1968, the planning and administration of public assistance programs became the responsibility of the department's Programs Division, while the delivery of the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan became the responsibility of the Operations Division.

Name of creator

(1968-1972)

Administrative history

The Operations Division of the Department of Welfare was established in 1968 upon a reorganization of the department. As part of the reorganization, all public assistance, child welfare, corrections, geriatric care and emergency welfare programs and services delivered by the department were made the responsibility of the branch. Programs and services were offered through a network of eleven regions and at various institutions throughout the province. The division was headed by the department's Associate Deputy Minister (Operations), C.A. Westcott.

Public assistance was administered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and other programs for citizens with financial need or disability. In addition to income support, the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan offered welfare services such as counselling, rehabilitation and preventative services to clients in need. As well, Regional Appeal Committees and Regional Advisory Boards, comprised of departmental staff and local citizens, addressed grievances raised by clients about their applications for assistance.

Child welfare programs and services assisted disadvantaged children and families. Child protection services addressed reports of child abuse or neglect in homes. Foster care was provided in situations of temporary or permanent removal of children from their families. Placements for these children included
foster homes and children's institutions. Adoption services provided counselling and facilitated planning for the placement of children relinquished for adoption. Adoptions were administered through ward and non-ward agreements, and through programs such as the AIM (Adopt Indian and Métis) program. Services to unmarried mothers included financial assistance, health care, maternity home care, counselling and training. Cases of juvenile offenders were administered in accordance with the federal Juvenile Delinquents Act.

Corrections programs, including adult probation and parole services, were provided through the provincial correctional institutions and from the various regional offices. Geriatric services and programs were provided to the aged and infirm at two geriatric centres and a nursing home. Emergency welfare services were available for response and relief after natural and man-made disasters.

The Operations Division ceased existence on May 12, 1972 when the Department of Welfare was discontinued. The operation of the department's programs and services was continued under the Social Services Division of the Department of Social Services.

Name of creator

(1972-1984)

Administrative history

The Department of Northern Saskatchewan (D.N.S.) was established on May 1, 1972. It was created based on a commitment made by the Government to the people of northern Saskatchewan to create a single agency that would facilitate the development and administration of programs and services tailored to the needs of the north. Central offices for the D.N.S. were located in La Ronge, and its jurisdiction was the Northern Administration District. The following deputy ministers were responsible for the department throughout its history: J. W. Churchman (1972-1974); M.B. Derrick (1974); Douglas F. McArthur (1974-1975); Marcel L'Heureux (Acting 1975-1976; 1976-1979); J.B. Stobbs (Acting 1979); R.L. Purdie (1979-1983); and Peter Van Es (1983-1984).

Responsibilities were transferred from the following government departments to the D.N.S. between May 1972 and April 1973: Natural Resources; Mineral Resources; Education; Social Services; Co-operatives; Public Health; Agricultures; and Government Services. Throughout much of its history, the department was organized based on four key areas: economic and resource development; project management; social development; and support services.

Economic and resource development initiatives created by the department encouraged growth and prosperity for the people of the north. Branches were devoted to the management, protection and development of resources including fisheries, forestry and agricultural lands; the promotion of tourism and recreational opportunities; and human resource development through the Prospectors' Incentive Plan and the Colleges Branch (later known as the Northern Continuing Education Branch).

Project management related to the development, construction and maintenance of public and private infrastructure in the north. Branches of the department devoted to project management included the Construction and Maintenance Branch; Northern Housing Branch; Engineering Services Branch; Municipal Facilities Branch and Central Services Branch.

Social Development focused on academic education of youth, social services, and public health services. Programs and services were provided through the Academic Education Branch; the Social Services Branch; and the Health Services Branch. By 1980, the Northern Continuing Education Branch was also included in the social development realm.

Support services included those services that benefited the people of the north, and those that assisted the department itself. External support services were provided through the Northern News Branch (later known as the Extension Services Branch); the Northern Air Services Branch; Field Services Branch; and the administration of Saskatchewan Northlands Agreement subsidies. Internal support services included administrative services; personnel and training; financial services; an office for legislation and regulations; planning and research; and the department's Crown solicitor.

The Department of Northern Saskatchewan was disestablished on July 16, 1984. This marked the conclusion of a nearly two-year process of functions and responsibilities of the department being realigned and transferred back to other government departments.

Name of creator

(1974-1982)

Administrative history

In the months following the establishment of the Department of Northern Saskatchewan (D.N.S.) in May 1972, responsibility for social services programs to the province's Northern Administration District was transferred from the Department of Social Services. A Social Services Division was organized under the Operations Branch of the D.N.S. during the 1972-1973 fiscal year. Regional offices were established at Uranium City, La Ronge, Buffalo Narrows and Creighton, and a temporary office was located at Meadow Lake. Program delivery in the areas of public assistance, child welfare and probation commenced. For the 1973-1974 fiscal year, a Social Services Division existed as part of the Health and Social Development Branch. Despite the change in organizational structure, there was no alteration to the programs and services offered. A permanent regional office at Green Lake replaced the temporary location at Meadow Lake.

By the 1974-1975 fiscal year, a Social Services Branch was established. For the duration of its existence, the branch focused on the program areas of public assistance; child and family welfare; corrections; community services. Programs and services continued to be delivered through the network of regional offices, which included a sixth office at La Loche by 1975.

Public assistance was offered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and Old Age Social Security Assistance. Child and family welfare services included: child protection; foster homes and child care centres; adoption services; day care centres; assistance to unmarried mothers; and administration of putative father cases. Community recreation centres were established in 1974. Additional community services introduced by the branch included: the Services to the Elderly Program (by 1980 known as the Northern Home Care Program); the Employment Support Program; and rehabilitation programs for residents with alcohol dependency. Corrections initiatives included: probation supervision and programs; the supervision of parolees from federal institutions living in the north; a probation hostel located at Potato Lake; and community corrections centres at Besnard Lake and Buffalo Narrows which opened in 1981 and 1982, respectively.

The Social Services Branch existed until 1982, when responsibility for social services was transferred back to the Department of Social Services. The Department of Northern Saskatchewan was disestablished in 1984.

Name of creator

(1972-2003)

Administrative history

The Department of Social Services was established in 1972 and repealed the former Department of Welfare Act. It provided for the department, its staff, departmental organization, powers and duties and other miscellaneous provisions necessary for the proper conduct of the business of the department, including the constitution of the Welfare Board. Administrative offices for the department were centralized in Regina and accommodated the Minister, Deputy Minister and directors of the departmental divisions.

At its establishment, the department was organized into four divisions: Regional Services; Community Grants and Standards; Programs; and Corrections, and two branches: Administration; and Personnel and Training. Programs and services were delivered through a decentralized network of eleven regional offices.

In late-1972, the Core Services Administration was established as an interdepartmental agency comprised of the Ministers and Deputy Ministers of the Departments of Health, Education and Social Services and an executive director. The role of the agency was to administer programs for mentally and physically handicapped citizens that were previously administered by the three departments.

By 1980, the department was organized into six divisions: Operations; Regional Services; Corrections; Continuing Care; Income Support; and Community and Personal Services. Programs and services were delivered through a regional office system as well as through non-governmental organizations.

In 1990, the department was organized into seven divisions: Policy and Intergovernmental Relations; Human Resources; Community Living; Young Offenders; Family Services; Income Security; and Support Services. Programs and services were delivered through a regional office system of six regions, through various Saskatchewan Employment Centres and in partnership with non-governmental organizations.

By 2000, the department was organized into three core divisions: Family and Youth; Community Living; and Income Security. Support services for the department were delivered through three divisions: Organizational Development; Technology and Property Management Services; and Financial Management Services, through four branches: Communication and Public Education; Research and Evaluation; Strategic Policy; and Intergovernmental Relations, and through the Community Development Unit. Programs and services continued to be delivered through a regional office system of six regions and in partnership with non-governmental organizations. As well, the department oversaw the Office of Disability Issues.

The Department of Social Services was discontinued on March 31, 2003 with the establishment of the Department of Community Resources and Employment.

Throughout its history, the department focused on four key functions in the delivery of its programs and services: social assistance; child and family services; correctional services; and community services. Social assistance was administered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and other assistance
programs to citizens with financial need or disability. In addition to income support, the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan offered welfare services such as counselling, rehabilitation and preventative services to clients in need.

Child care services offered included protection of children in troubled family situations, administration of juvenile offenders under the Juvenile Delinquents
Act (later the Young Offenders Act), assistance to unmarried mothers; adoption; foster care; and institutional care for troubled youth. The administration of young offender case files was transferred to the Department of Corrections and Public Safety in 2002.

Correctional services aimed to protect society from those who committed crimes, but also to assist those who committed crimes though guidance, retraining or treatment programs. These programs included educational and vocational training, counselling and therapy, and probation, community residence and parole services. Correctional services were transferred to the Department of Justice in 1983.

Community services offered by the department included day care, recreational services for senior citizens, housing and continuing care for seniors, the disabled or chronically ill and children under institutional care, rehabilitation services and programs for disabled citizens and those with special needs, and
emergency social services. In 1983, the administration of continuing care was transferred to the Department of Health.

Name of creator

(1972-1978)

Administrative history

Originally established in 1972 as the Regional Services Division, the Social Services Division of the Department of Social Services was responsible for the delivery of a variety of programs under authority of the following acts: The Family Services Act, 1973; The Saskatchewan Assistance Act and Regulations; The Children of Unmarried Parents Act, 1973; The Rehabilitation Act; and the federal Juvenile Delinquents Act. Programs and services of the division were delivered through a decentralized network of regional offices throughout the province.

Programs administered by the division centered on child care and welfare, employment readiness, and income support.

Child protection services addressed reports of child abuse or neglect in homes. To aid in the delivery of service, a Child Protection Registry was established in 1977. Foster care was provided in situations of temporary or permanent removal of children from their families. The Special Foster Care Program offered care for children unable to benefit from traditional or institutional placements. Adoption services provided counselling and facilitated planning for the placement of children relinquished for adoption. Adoptions were administered through ward and non-ward agreements, and through programs such as the Aim Centre and REACH (Resources for the Adoption of Children) which found placements in homes for children with special needs. Services to unmarried mothers included financial assistance, health care, maternity home care, counselling and training. Cases of juvenile offenders were administered in accordance with the federal Juvenile Delinquents Act. Institutional care for troubled youth was provided at four child care facilities (Saskatchewan Boys' School/Centre, Roy Wilson Centre, Dales House and Kilburn Hall) and at various private institutions throughout the province.

Employment readiness was offered through initiatives such as the Work Activity Program, the Employment Support Program, the Summer Employment Project, the Winter Works Incentive Program, and Work Preparation Centres. These programs frequently operated in co-operation with other government departments. The aim of the programs was to provide skills training and employment opportunities for socially or economically disadvantaged citizens.

Income support was administered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and other assistance programs to citizens with financial need or disability. In addition to income support, the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan offered welfare services such as counselling, rehabilitation and preventative services to clients in need. As well, Local Appeal Boards comprised of departmental staff and local citizens addressed grievances raised by clients about their applications for assistance.

The division also provided corrections services (1972 only), adult probation services (until 1976), and emergency welfare services.

The Social Services Division was renamed the Social Services Branch in 1976, and was in existence until a departmental re-organization in 1978. Responsibilities for child, youth and family services were transferred to the Family and Community Services Branch, employment programs were administered by the Employment Programs Branch, and income support programs became the responsibility of the Income Security Branch.

Name of creator

(1978-1979)

Administrative history

Established in 1978, the Income Security Branch of the Department of Social Services was responsible for the delivery of programs under authority of The Saskatchewan Assistance Act. Income support was administered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan (SAP), the province's basic income support program. Funding for the program was shared with the federal government under its Canada Assistance Plan. In addition to income support, the SAP offered welfare services such as counselling, rehabilitation and preventative services to clients in need. The branch also administered two supplemental programs: the Family Income Plan for low-income families with children under the age of 18; and the Saskatchewan Income Plan for residents 65 and older whose incomes were limited to the federal Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement. As well, local appeal boards comprised of departmental staff and local citizens addressed grievances raised by clients about their applications for assistance under the SAP. Decisions of a local appeal board could be further appealed to the Provincial Social Services Appeal Board.

As a result of departmental re-organization in 1979, the Income Security Branch became the responsibility of the department's Income Support and Employment Services Division.

Name of creator

(1979-1980)

Administrative history

Established in 1979, the Income Support and Employment Services Division of the Department of Social Services was responsible for the delivery of income security and employment programs under authority of The Saskatchewan Assistance Act and The Rehabilitation Act. The division was organized into two branches: Income Security; and Employment Programs.

Income support was administered by the Income Security Branch through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan (SAP), the province's basic income support program. Funding for the program was shared with the federal government under its Canada Assistance Plan. In addition to income support, the SAP offered welfare services such as counselling, rehabilitation and preventative services to clients in need. The branch also administered two supplemental programs: the Family Income Plan for low-income families with children under the age of 18; and the Saskatchewan Income Plan for residents 65 and older whose incomes were limited to the federal Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement. Service delivery for the Income Family Plan and the Saskatchewan Income Plan was done centrally, while the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan was administered through a network of regional offices throughout the province. A verification section within the branch ensured that funds from the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and the Family Income Plan were administered in accordance with the legislation, regulations and policies of the department.

Programs and services administered by the Employment Programs Branch included: the Employment Support Program; the Special Agricultural and Rural Development Agreement; the Vocational Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons' Agreement; as well as funding assistance to work preparation centres at Regina and Prince Albert. The Employment Centre Program provided grants to groups sponsoring employment opportunities to individuals receiving income support. The Special Agricultural and Rural Development Agreement provided funding for First Nations individuals to develop, finance and operate projects aimed at creating employment opportunities in rural Saskatchewan. The Vocational Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons' Agreement, co-funded by the federal and provincial governments, offered assessment, counselling, vocational training and employment placement for eligible individuals. Two work preparation centres assisted residents in finding and maintaining employment as an alternative to receiving income support.

As a result of re-organization in 1980, delivery of the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan became the responsibility of the department's Regional Services Division while program administration remained the responsibility of the Income Support Division.

Name of creator

(1980-1983)

Administrative history

Established in 1980, the Regional Services Division of the Department of Social Services delivered services under the authority of The Saskatchewan Assistance Act and Regulations, The Family Services Act, The Unified Family Court Act and the federal Juvenile Delinquents Act. Services and programs were administered from eight regions with district offices located in major centres within the regions. Services provided by the division included income support, child protection, unmarried parents' services, adoption, foster care, young offenders' services, special youth resources and emergency social services.

Income support services determined the eligibility of recipients for financial assistance and administered the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan. The Child Protection Program was responsible for the investigation into all reports of child abuse or neglect. Subsequent measures included counselling, referral and supportive services or the removal of a child from the home. Unmarried parents' services provided information, referrals, counselling, and pre-natal and post-natal support services to unmarried parents. Additionally, services were provided to unmarried mothers seeking to place children for adoption. Adoption services were responsible for the recruitment, screening, preparation and selection of adoptive families for children in need of placement, as well as facilitating private and step-parent adoptions. In addition, the REACH (Resources for the Adoption of Children) program coordinated adoptions for children with special needs and circumstances. The Foster Home Program provided substitute family environments for children in need of temporary or permanent placement. Responsibility for children in foster care was shared between the department and the foster parents in the program. Young offenders' services administered cases of juvenile offenders in the justice system. Departmental, community and residential services included counselling, legal assistance, psychological and psychiatric assessments, predisposition investigations, probation services and detention services. The division operated four child care facilities (Saskatchewan Boys' Centre, Roy Wilson Centre, Dales House and Kilburn Hall), purchased residential care from three non-governmental organizations and funded various group homes and receiving homes throughout the province. Emergency social services provided food, clothing, lodging and personal services in the event of large-scale disasters.

As a result of re-organization in 1983, income support became the responsibility of the department's Income Security Division, while all other programs became the responsibility of the Family Support Division.

Custodial history

The Saskatchewan Department of Northern Saskatchewan transferred some of these records to the Saskatoon office, Saskatchewan Archives in six accessions between 1978 and 1982: S78-67 (July 11, 1978); S79-45 (May 3, 1979); S81-15 (February 2, 1981); S81-135 (July 28, 1981); S81-202 (December 3, 1981); and S82-199 (August 23, 1982).

Various offices of the Saskatchewan Department of Social Services transferred some of these records to the Saskatoon and Regina offices, Saskatchewan Archives, in six accessions between 1984 and 1995: S84-11 (January 12, 1984); S84-21 (January 25, 1984); S84-88 (May 23, 1984); S84-205 (September 25, 1984); S85-47 (February 19, 1985); and R1995-199 (May 15, 1995).

Scope and content

This series consists of a sample of Saskatchewan Assistance Plan (SAP) case files created and used primarily by staff of the Social Services Division of the Department of Northern Saskatchewan (but also the Department of Social Services, the Department of Welfare, and the Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation) between 1954 and 1982. Department staff created these files in the provision of financial assistance through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan (prior to 1966 known as Social Aid) to residents of Saskatchewan in accordance to The Saskatchewan Assistance Act (and its predecessor enactment, The Social Aid Act). The series also consists of a small volume of Old Age Security Supplemental Allowance (OASSA) case file records. The OASSA program was discontinued in 1968 at which time recipients received assistance from the SAP and the federal Old Age Security Program.

No sub-series have been identified in this series.

The types of records in this series include: anecdotal client summary reports by staff; applications for assistance; transient aid authorization forms; applications for temporary health care coverage; declaration of circumstances forms; public assistance assessments; trustee's agreement forms; requisitions for goods and services; face sheets; client index registrations; means test decision sheets; file allotment slips; memoranda; and correspondence.

Notes area

Physical condition

Records are in good physical condition.

Immediate source of acquisition

Arrangement

Original order maintained by archivist.

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Restrictions on access

These records are subject to access restrictions. Please consult reference archivist for assistance.

Terms governing use, reproduction, and publication

Use, publication and/or reproduction are subject to Crown Copyright. Please consult reference archivist for assistance.

Finding aids

SAFA 693 consists of a series description. Client file lists are subject to access restrictions.

Associated materials

R-661 - Department of Social Services (and its predecessors) records that include Saskatchewan Assistance Plan case files.

Related materials

Accruals

No further accruals are expected.

General note

To consult the records, visit or contact the Regina office.

Location note

Locations for retrieval: Regina - Henderson; Regina - Hillsdale.

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