Series S 80 - Probation Case Files series

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Probation Case Files series

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  • Textual record

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S 80

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  • 1993 - 2000 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Justice. Corrections Division, 1993-2002
  • 1991 - 1993 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Justice. Solicitor General Division
  • 1987 - 1991 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Justice. Corrections and Justice Services Division
  • 1983 - 1987 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Justice. Corrections Division, 1983-1987
  • 1983 - 2000 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Justice
  • 1976 - 1983 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services. Corrections Division
  • 1974 - 1981 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Northern Saskatchewan. Social Services Branch
  • 1973 - 1981 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Northern Saskatchewan
  • 1972 - 1976 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services. Social Services Division
  • 1972 - 1983 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Social Services
  • 1968 - 1972 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare. Operations Division
  • 1966 - 1968 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare. Corrections Branch
  • 1966 - 1972 (Creation)
    Creation
    Saskatchewan. Dept. of Welfare

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6.785 m of textual records

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Name of creator

(1965-1972)

Administrative history

The Department of Welfare was established on May 1, 1965 and repealed The Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Act (S.S. 1949, c. 10). It provided for the department, its staff, departmental organization, powers and duties, and other miscellaneous provisions necessary for the proper conduct of the business of the department. At its establishment, the department was organized into eight branches: Staff Services; Public Assistance; Child Welfare; Housing and Special-care Homes; Corrections; Rehabilitation; Regional Services; and Emergency Welfare, along with the Bureau on Alcoholism. Programs and services were offered through a network of eleven regions in the province.

The Staff Services Branch provided administrative services for the department, including accounting, records management, procurement, legal services, human resources, research and planning.

The Public Assistance Branch provided programs to residents of the province who demonstrated financial need. Programs included social aid, aid to dependent families, old age assistance, disabled and blind persons' allowances, and deserted wives and children's assistance.

The protection and care of children in need was provided by the Child Welfare Branch. Programs offered included protection services, support to unmarried mothers, adoption services, foster care and institutional care for children not suitable for foster care.

The Housing and Special-care Homes Branch offered programs and residence for aged, needy and blind persons, as well as residence for low-income families throughout Saskatchewan.

The Corrections Branch administered correctional services to offenders through its three correctional centres, as well as rehabilitation, parole and probation services.

Vocational rehabilitation programs and services were offered to the province's disabled by the Rehabilitation Branch. The branch also administered academic and vocational training programs to Métis groups in the province.

The Regional Services Branch administered a network of ten regions that delivered public assistance, child welfare, vocational rehabilitation, corrections and geriatric programs and services throughout the province. Regional offices were located at Regina, Weyburn, Swift Current, Moose Jaw, Fort Qu'Appelle, Yorkton, Melfort, Saskatoon, Prince Albert, North Battleford and Meadow Lake.

The Emergency Welfare Services Branch oversaw programs and services that provided response and relief after natural and man-made disasters. The branch also made available mobile disaster assistance to other provinces and to the United States.

The Bureau on Alcoholism administered programs that offered education and treatment to persons afflicted with alcoholism. The Bureau also conducted research into alcoholism and its treatment. Responsibility for the Bureau was transferred to the Department of Public Health in November 1965.

In 1968, a major reorganization of the department took place, aimed at further decentralizing authority and responsibility of the department's programs and services. The department's internal administration was organized into five branches: Administration; Personnel; Staff Training; Information and Public Relations; and Research and Statistics. An Operations Division was established to deliver services offered by the department to residents of the province. The previous network of regional offices was maintained, with each lead by a regional director. As well, the province's correctional, child care, rehabilitation and geriatric centres were organized under the division. The Program Division was responsible for the assessment and modification of programs offered by the department. It consisted of a director and eight consultants specializing in program areas of the department.

The Department of Welfare was discontinued on May 12, 1972 with the establishment of the Department of Social Services.

Name of creator

(1965-1968)

Administrative history

The Corrections Branch of the Department of Welfare was established on May 1, 1965 in conjunction with the establishment of the department. All services and programs of the Department of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation's Corrections Branch were continued under the new department. The branch director, M.E. Rubin, reported to the department's Director of Welfare.

Correctional institutions administered and operated by the branch were located in Regina (men's) and Prince Albert (men's and women's). In addition, several minimum-security work camps were located throughout the province. Programs and services offered by the branch provided offenders with opportunities for academic, vocational and physical training, as well as emotional, spiritual and family counselling. Parole services were coordinated through the institutions in cooperation with the National Parole Board.

The Corrections Branch operated in conjunction with the department's Regional Services Branch in the delivery of probation services by field staff through a network of regional offices around the province.

As a result of departmental reorganization in 1968, the operation and administration of correctional institutions and work camps was transferred to the Institutions Branch. Probation services were transferred to the Operations Branch.

Name of creator

(1968-1972)

Administrative history

The Operations Division of the Department of Welfare was established in 1968 upon a reorganization of the department. As part of the reorganization, all public assistance, child welfare, corrections, geriatric care and emergency welfare programs and services delivered by the department were made the responsibility of the branch. Programs and services were offered through a network of eleven regions and at various institutions throughout the province. The division was headed by the department's Associate Deputy Minister (Operations), C.A. Westcott.

Public assistance was administered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and other programs for citizens with financial need or disability. In addition to income support, the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan offered welfare services such as counselling, rehabilitation and preventative services to clients in need. As well, Regional Appeal Committees and Regional Advisory Boards, comprised of departmental staff and local citizens, addressed grievances raised by clients about their applications for assistance.

Child welfare programs and services assisted disadvantaged children and families. Child protection services addressed reports of child abuse or neglect in homes. Foster care was provided in situations of temporary or permanent removal of children from their families. Placements for these children included
foster homes and children's institutions. Adoption services provided counselling and facilitated planning for the placement of children relinquished for adoption. Adoptions were administered through ward and non-ward agreements, and through programs such as the AIM (Adopt Indian and Métis) program. Services to unmarried mothers included financial assistance, health care, maternity home care, counselling and training. Cases of juvenile offenders were administered in accordance with the federal Juvenile Delinquents Act.

Corrections programs, including adult probation and parole services, were provided through the provincial correctional institutions and from the various regional offices. Geriatric services and programs were provided to the aged and infirm at two geriatric centres and a nursing home. Emergency welfare services were available for response and relief after natural and man-made disasters.

The Operations Division ceased existence on May 12, 1972 when the Department of Welfare was discontinued. The operation of the department's programs and services was continued under the Social Services Division of the Department of Social Services.

Name of creator

(1972-2003)

Administrative history

The Department of Social Services was established in 1972 and repealed the former Department of Welfare Act. It provided for the department, its staff, departmental organization, powers and duties and other miscellaneous provisions necessary for the proper conduct of the business of the department, including the constitution of the Welfare Board. Administrative offices for the department were centralized in Regina and accommodated the Minister, Deputy Minister and directors of the departmental divisions.

At its establishment, the department was organized into four divisions: Regional Services; Community Grants and Standards; Programs; and Corrections, and two branches: Administration; and Personnel and Training. Programs and services were delivered through a decentralized network of eleven regional offices.

In late-1972, the Core Services Administration was established as an interdepartmental agency comprised of the Ministers and Deputy Ministers of the Departments of Health, Education and Social Services and an executive director. The role of the agency was to administer programs for mentally and physically handicapped citizens that were previously administered by the three departments.

By 1980, the department was organized into six divisions: Operations; Regional Services; Corrections; Continuing Care; Income Support; and Community and Personal Services. Programs and services were delivered through a regional office system as well as through non-governmental organizations.

In 1990, the department was organized into seven divisions: Policy and Intergovernmental Relations; Human Resources; Community Living; Young Offenders; Family Services; Income Security; and Support Services. Programs and services were delivered through a regional office system of six regions, through various Saskatchewan Employment Centres and in partnership with non-governmental organizations.

By 2000, the department was organized into three core divisions: Family and Youth; Community Living; and Income Security. Support services for the department were delivered through three divisions: Organizational Development; Technology and Property Management Services; and Financial Management Services, through four branches: Communication and Public Education; Research and Evaluation; Strategic Policy; and Intergovernmental Relations, and through the Community Development Unit. Programs and services continued to be delivered through a regional office system of six regions and in partnership with non-governmental organizations. As well, the department oversaw the Office of Disability Issues.

The Department of Social Services was discontinued on March 31, 2003 with the establishment of the Department of Community Resources and Employment.

Throughout its history, the department focused on four key functions in the delivery of its programs and services: social assistance; child and family services; correctional services; and community services. Social assistance was administered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and other assistance
programs to citizens with financial need or disability. In addition to income support, the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan offered welfare services such as counselling, rehabilitation and preventative services to clients in need.

Child care services offered included protection of children in troubled family situations, administration of juvenile offenders under the Juvenile Delinquents
Act (later the Young Offenders Act), assistance to unmarried mothers; adoption; foster care; and institutional care for troubled youth. The administration of young offender case files was transferred to the Department of Corrections and Public Safety in 2002.

Correctional services aimed to protect society from those who committed crimes, but also to assist those who committed crimes though guidance, retraining or treatment programs. These programs included educational and vocational training, counselling and therapy, and probation, community residence and parole services. Correctional services were transferred to the Department of Justice in 1983.

Community services offered by the department included day care, recreational services for senior citizens, housing and continuing care for seniors, the disabled or chronically ill and children under institutional care, rehabilitation services and programs for disabled citizens and those with special needs, and
emergency social services. In 1983, the administration of continuing care was transferred to the Department of Health.

Name of creator

(1972-1978)

Administrative history

Originally established in 1972 as the Regional Services Division, the Social Services Division of the Department of Social Services was responsible for the delivery of a variety of programs under authority of the following acts: The Family Services Act, 1973; The Saskatchewan Assistance Act and Regulations; The Children of Unmarried Parents Act, 1973; The Rehabilitation Act; and the federal Juvenile Delinquents Act. Programs and services of the division were delivered through a decentralized network of regional offices throughout the province.

Programs administered by the division centered on child care and welfare, employment readiness, and income support.

Child protection services addressed reports of child abuse or neglect in homes. To aid in the delivery of service, a Child Protection Registry was established in 1977. Foster care was provided in situations of temporary or permanent removal of children from their families. The Special Foster Care Program offered care for children unable to benefit from traditional or institutional placements. Adoption services provided counselling and facilitated planning for the placement of children relinquished for adoption. Adoptions were administered through ward and non-ward agreements, and through programs such as the Aim Centre and REACH (Resources for the Adoption of Children) which found placements in homes for children with special needs. Services to unmarried mothers included financial assistance, health care, maternity home care, counselling and training. Cases of juvenile offenders were administered in accordance with the federal Juvenile Delinquents Act. Institutional care for troubled youth was provided at four child care facilities (Saskatchewan Boys' School/Centre, Roy Wilson Centre, Dales House and Kilburn Hall) and at various private institutions throughout the province.

Employment readiness was offered through initiatives such as the Work Activity Program, the Employment Support Program, the Summer Employment Project, the Winter Works Incentive Program, and Work Preparation Centres. These programs frequently operated in co-operation with other government departments. The aim of the programs was to provide skills training and employment opportunities for socially or economically disadvantaged citizens.

Income support was administered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and other assistance programs to citizens with financial need or disability. In addition to income support, the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan offered welfare services such as counselling, rehabilitation and preventative services to clients in need. As well, Local Appeal Boards comprised of departmental staff and local citizens addressed grievances raised by clients about their applications for assistance.

The division also provided corrections services (1972 only), adult probation services (until 1976), and emergency welfare services.

The Social Services Division was renamed the Social Services Branch in 1976, and was in existence until a departmental re-organization in 1978. Responsibilities for child, youth and family services were transferred to the Family and Community Services Branch, employment programs were administered by the Employment Programs Branch, and income support programs became the responsibility of the Income Security Branch.

Name of creator

(1972-1983)

Administrative history

The Corrections Division of the Department of Social Services was established on October 1, 1972 as part of a departmental reorganization. Creation of the division stemmed from the recommendations of the 1971 Saskatchewan Corrections Study Committee that all correctional services be integrated into one organizational unit. Personnel responsible for the division included a director of corrections, a chief probation officer, a director of community corrections and an institutional planner. The director of corrections reported to the department's deputy minister.

The key functional areas of the division were correctional centres, probation programs and community corrections programs. At its establishment, the division was responsible for the administration of correctional centres at Regina (which housed male offenders from southern Saskatchewan), at Prince Albert (those from northern Saskatchewan) and at the Pine Grove Centre in Prince Albert (female offenders from all of Saskatchewan). The department's Northern Regional Office also administered small correctional facilities at Buffalo Narrows, Creighton and Besnard Lake for low to medium-risk offenders residing in the far north of the province. A new provincial correctional centre opened in Saskatoon in 1981, as did a replacement facility for men in Prince Albert. A community correctional centre was established in North Battleford in 1980.

Typically, offenders housed at these correctional facilities were serving: sentences of less than two years; were remanded while awaiting trial or sentencing; or were sentenced to federal penitentiaries but were awaiting decision from the Court of Appeal. The larger correctional centres at Regina, Prince Albert and Saskatoon were organized into three function-based areas: custody; treatment; and support services (laundry, kitchen, clerical, etc.). Treatment and rehabilitation programs offered to offenders while in custody included: work camps; vocational and academic training; group activities and recreation; medical and dental services; counselling; family therapy; and allowances for temporary absences. Parole services were coordinated by the institutions in cooperation with the National Parole Board.

Probation programs and services were delivered primarily by probation officers staffed at regional offices throughout the province. The two key functions of probation officers were to prepare pre-sentence reports and to supervise offenders on probation. The preparation of pre-sentence reports involved investigation into the circumstances leading to the offence, assessment of the offender to determine a personality profile, and establishment of a rehabilitation program for the offender. This program was then monitored as part of the supervision of the offender during the period of probation.

Various probation programs and services were established by the division, including: the Indian Probation Office Program (1975); Volunteers in Probation (1976); probation hostels (1980); attendance centres (1980); and the Impaired Driver's Treatment Program (1980). These programs were aimed at diversifying the opportunities for offenders on probation to rehabilitate, thus avoiding further offences.

Community corrections offered programs and services that protected society while providing rehabilitation opportunities to offenders, often outside the confines of a correctional facility. The Community Training Residence program offered residence and rehabilitation opportunities for low-risk offenders through employment, academic and vocational training, counselling, and addictions treatment from a variety of community resources. The Fine Option Program was established in 1975 as a means for offenders to work off fines through volunteer service at community agencies rather than face incarceration for non-payment of fines. The Bail Verification and Supervision Program, introduced in 1982, assisted courts in determining which offenders could be released under surety or supervision while awaiting trial. Also introduced in 1982, the Restitution Program provided an alternative measure for property crime offenders to reimburse their victims the monetary value of the damage or loss from their crime rather than being incarcerated.

The Corrections Division of the Department of Social Services was discontinued on April 30, 1983 upon the establishment of the Department of Justice. Responsibilities of the division were transferred to the Corrections Division of the new department.

Name of creator

(1972-1984)

Administrative history

The Department of Northern Saskatchewan (D.N.S.) was established on May 1, 1972. It was created based on a commitment made by the Government to the people of northern Saskatchewan to create a single agency that would facilitate the development and administration of programs and services tailored to the needs of the north. Central offices for the D.N.S. were located in La Ronge, and its jurisdiction was the Northern Administration District. The following deputy ministers were responsible for the department throughout its history: J. W. Churchman (1972-1974); M.B. Derrick (1974); Douglas F. McArthur (1974-1975); Marcel L'Heureux (Acting 1975-1976; 1976-1979); J.B. Stobbs (Acting 1979); R.L. Purdie (1979-1983); and Peter Van Es (1983-1984).

Responsibilities were transferred from the following government departments to the D.N.S. between May 1972 and April 1973: Natural Resources; Mineral Resources; Education; Social Services; Co-operatives; Public Health; Agricultures; and Government Services. Throughout much of its history, the department was organized based on four key areas: economic and resource development; project management; social development; and support services.

Economic and resource development initiatives created by the department encouraged growth and prosperity for the people of the north. Branches were devoted to the management, protection and development of resources including fisheries, forestry and agricultural lands; the promotion of tourism and recreational opportunities; and human resource development through the Prospectors' Incentive Plan and the Colleges Branch (later known as the Northern Continuing Education Branch).

Project management related to the development, construction and maintenance of public and private infrastructure in the north. Branches of the department devoted to project management included the Construction and Maintenance Branch; Northern Housing Branch; Engineering Services Branch; Municipal Facilities Branch and Central Services Branch.

Social Development focused on academic education of youth, social services, and public health services. Programs and services were provided through the Academic Education Branch; the Social Services Branch; and the Health Services Branch. By 1980, the Northern Continuing Education Branch was also included in the social development realm.

Support services included those services that benefited the people of the north, and those that assisted the department itself. External support services were provided through the Northern News Branch (later known as the Extension Services Branch); the Northern Air Services Branch; Field Services Branch; and the administration of Saskatchewan Northlands Agreement subsidies. Internal support services included administrative services; personnel and training; financial services; an office for legislation and regulations; planning and research; and the department's Crown solicitor.

The Department of Northern Saskatchewan was disestablished on July 16, 1984. This marked the conclusion of a nearly two-year process of functions and responsibilities of the department being realigned and transferred back to other government departments.

Name of creator

(1974-1982)

Administrative history

In the months following the establishment of the Department of Northern Saskatchewan (D.N.S.) in May 1972, responsibility for social services programs to the province's Northern Administration District was transferred from the Department of Social Services. A Social Services Division was organized under the Operations Branch of the D.N.S. during the 1972-1973 fiscal year. Regional offices were established at Uranium City, La Ronge, Buffalo Narrows and Creighton, and a temporary office was located at Meadow Lake. Program delivery in the areas of public assistance, child welfare and probation commenced. For the 1973-1974 fiscal year, a Social Services Division existed as part of the Health and Social Development Branch. Despite the change in organizational structure, there was no alteration to the programs and services offered. A permanent regional office at Green Lake replaced the temporary location at Meadow Lake.

By the 1974-1975 fiscal year, a Social Services Branch was established. For the duration of its existence, the branch focused on the program areas of public assistance; child and family welfare; corrections; community services. Programs and services continued to be delivered through the network of regional offices, which included a sixth office at La Loche by 1975.

Public assistance was offered through the Saskatchewan Assistance Plan and Old Age Social Security Assistance. Child and family welfare services included: child protection; foster homes and child care centres; adoption services; day care centres; assistance to unmarried mothers; and administration of putative father cases. Community recreation centres were established in 1974. Additional community services introduced by the branch included: the Services to the Elderly Program (by 1980 known as the Northern Home Care Program); the Employment Support Program; and rehabilitation programs for residents with alcohol dependency. Corrections initiatives included: probation supervision and programs; the supervision of parolees from federal institutions living in the north; a probation hostel located at Potato Lake; and community corrections centres at Besnard Lake and Buffalo Narrows which opened in 1981 and 1982, respectively.

The Social Services Branch existed until 1982, when responsibility for social services was transferred back to the Department of Social Services. The Department of Northern Saskatchewan was disestablished in 1984.

Name of creator

(1983-)

Administrative history

The Department of Justice was established on May 1, 1983 as a result of a government-wide reorganization. Many of the functions and responsibilities of the disestablished Department of the Attorney General, along with responsibilities from the Departments of Social Services and Intergovernmental Affairs, were transferred to the new department. The Minister of Justice remained the Attorney General of Saskatchewan and continued to hold the authority and responsibilities of the office.

Throughout its history, the department has been organized into several divisions based on the functions of: civil law; public law; corrections; justice and court services; public prosecution; registry and regulatory services; community justice; and administrative or corporate services. Responsibility for each division has been held by an appointed assistant deputy minister, associate deputy minister or executive director who has reported to the deputy minister of the department.

The Civil Law Division has provided legal services to the departments, agencies boards and commissions of the Government of Saskatchewan. Services have included the provision of legal opinions and the representation as counsel in lawsuits on behalf of the Crown.

The Public Law Division has provided legal advice to Government on matters relating to Aboriginal and constitutional law, the drafting of legislation and other legislative services. Prior to the establishment of the Community Justice Division in 1999, the division was responsible for law enforcement services, the coroners' office, control of firearms, and the Victim Services Program. As well, the division has been responsible for the Queen's Printer for the majority of the department's history.

The Corrections Division provided services and programs aimed at the care, control and supervision of offenders. This included the operation of correctional institutions and community training residences, and the administration of community corrections programs and the corrections management information system. For periods of the department's history, the responsibility for corrections was combined with justice services (in the Corrections and Justice Services Division, 1987-1991) and public safety (in the Solicitor General Division, 1991-1993). The Corrections Division was discontinued in April 2002. Its responsibilities and functions were transferred to the newly-established Department of Corrections and Public Safety.

Justice and court services have been the responsibility of the Court Services Division (1983), the Justice Services Division (1984-1987), the Corrections and Justice Services Division (1987-1991), the Registry Services Division (1991-2002), the Courts and Civil Justice Division (2002-2011) and the Court Services Division (2011-present). Throughout the history of the department, justice and court services have included the administration of provincial courts and judicial centres, sheriff services, maintenance enforcement, the services of the Registrar of Courts, family justice services, dispute resolution services, and support to the Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission.

The Public Prosecution Division has provided legal representation on behalf of the public for matters in the criminal justice system. Functions of the division have also included the provision of guidance to municipal police forces in the investigation of crimes and assistance in the training of law
enforcement officers.

Registry and regulatory services have been the responsibility of the Property Registration and Management Division (1983), the Justice Services Division (1984-1987), the Corrections and Justice Services Division (1987-1991), the Registry Services Division (1991-2002), the Courts and Civil Justice Division (2002-2008) and the Regulatory Services Division (2008-present). Registry and regulatory programs and services have included property registration, land titles assurance claims and the incorporation of businesses and non-profit organizations. These services were transferred to the Information Services Corporation between 2000 and 2010. Other functions of the division have included: mediation services; the administration of the Office of the Public Trustee; family justice services; support to various government boards and commissions; access and privacy services; information management; and consumer protection services.

The Community Justice Division was established in 1999 and has been responsible for: law enforcement services; the coroners' office; victims services; community services; Aboriginal and northern justice initiatives; the Aboriginal Court Worker Program; and the Interpersonal Violence and Abuse Unit.

Administrative and corporate services of the department have been provided by the Administration Division (1983, 1987-1991), the Management Services
Division (1984-1987), and the Finance and Administration Division, as well as through various branches that reported directly to the deputy minister. Services provided have included human resources, communications, policy and planning, public education and finance. Administrative support has also been provided to the various independent boards and commissions that report to the department.

Throughout the department's history, boards, commissions and other bodies that have reported to the department have included: the Saskatchewan Farm
Ownership Board; Farm Land Security Board; Public and Private Rights Board; Surface Rights Arbitration Board; Provincial Mediation Board; Office of the Rentalsman (known after 2006 as the Office of Residential Tenancies); Rent Appeal Commission; Saskatchewan Securities Commission; Saskatchewan Police Commission; Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission; Saskatchewan Law Reform Commission; Crimes Compensation Board; Saskatchewan Film Classification Board; Saskatchewan Film Classification Appeal Board; Agricultural Implements Board; Saskatchewan Mental Patients Review Board; Saskatchewan Police Complaints Investigator; Co-operative Securities Board; Public Disclosure Committee; Commission on First Nation and Métis Peoples; Saskatchewan Financial Services Commission; Law Foundation of Saskatchewan; North Battleford Water Inquiry; Commission of Inquiry into the Wrongful Conviction of David Milgaard; Commission of Inquiry into the Wrongful Death of Neil Stonechild; Funeral and Cremation Services Council; Justice of the Peace Review Council; Provincial Court Judicial Council; Saskatchewan Human Rights Tribunal; Saskatchewan Legal Aid Appeal Commission; Saskatchewan Real Estate Commission; and Traditional Elders Ministerial Advisory Committee.

In 2007, the name of the department was changed to the Ministry of Justice and Attorney General in accordance with The Ministry of Justice and Attorney General Regulations (R.S.S. 2007, c. G-5.1 Reg 142). A subsequent name change to the Ministry of Justice occurred in 2012 (S.S. 2012, c. G-5.1 Reg 157).

In May 2012, a government reorganization resulted in the former Ministry of Corrections, Public Safety and Policing being downgraded to the Corrections and Policing Division of the Ministry of Justice (with public safety responsibilities being transferred to the Ministry of Government Relations.) The division, which has a cabinet minister responsible, reports (2013) to the minister. All other Ministry of Justice functions and responsibilities remain.

Name of creator

(1983-1987)

Administrative history

The Corrections Division of the Department of Justice was established in 1983 as part of the establishment of the department. It assumed the responsibilities of the former Corrections Division of the Department of Social Services. The division was responsible for the administration of correctional institutions in Saskatchewan, and for the provision of adult corrections programs and services. At its establishment, the division was organized into two branches: the Institutional Operations Branch and the Community Operations Branch. The Executive Director of the division, Terry Thompson, reported to the department's Associate Deputy Minister (Operations) (1983) and the Deputy Minister (1984-1987).

The Institutional Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of facilities and programs for the custody and care of adult offenders sentenced to terms of less than two years. Provincial correctional centres were located at Regina (which housed male offenders from southern Saskatchewan), at Saskatoon (central Saskatchewan), at Prince Albert (northern Saskatchewan) and at the Pine Grove Centre in Prince Albert (female offenders from all of Saskatchewan). The branch also operated a community correctional centre at North Battleford for offenders serving terms of less than four months. The division's northern region administered small community correctional centres at Buffalo Narrows and Creighton for low to medium-risk offenders residing in the far north of the province. Programs offered to offenders while in custody included: vocational and academic training; group activities and recreation; medical and dental services; counselling; and family therapy. Parole services were coordinated by the institutions in cooperation with the National Parole Board. Five community training residences offered residence and rehabilitation opportunities for low-risk offenders and probationers through employment, academic and vocational training, counselling, and addictions treatment. Nine correctional camps were located primarily at provincial parks throughout the province where low-risk offenders lived and worked while serving their terms. By 1985, Administrative Release Programs became operational and included the Work Incentive, Conditional Release and Institutional Fine Option programs.

The Community Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of programs and services aimed at protecting society while providing probation and rehabilitation opportunities to offenders outside the confines of a correctional facility. Probation programs and services were delivered primarily by probation officers staffed at regional offices throughout the province. The two key functions of probation officers were to prepare pre-sentence reports and to supervise offenders on probation. Other community-based corrections programs administered by the branch included: the Fine Option Program; Community Service Order Program; Bail Verification and Supervision Program; the Restitution Program; Volunteers in Probation program; attendance centres; and the Impaired Driver's Treatment Program. In addition, the branch administered departmental grants to non-governmental agencies that provided services to offenders.

The Corrections Division of the Department of Justice was discontinued in 1987 upon a reorganization of the department. The Corrections and Justice Services Division of the department took over these responsibilities.

Name of creator

(1987-1991)

Administrative history

The Corrections and Justice Services Division of the Department of Justice was established in 1987 as an amalgamation of the department's former Justice Services and Corrections Divisions. The new division was responsible for the administration of court, correctional and property registration services and programs in Saskatchewan. At its establishment, the division was organized into three primary branches: Court Services Branch; Corrections Branch; and Property Registration Branch. The division was lead by an Assistant Deputy Minister, Terry Thompson, who reported to the department's Deputy Minister.

The Court Services Branch provided administrative and operational support to the Courts of Saskatchewan, The branch was organized into four units: Sheriff Services; Registrar of Courts; Court Operations; and Administrative Support. The Sheriff Services Unit provided the services of sheriffs and sheriff's officers throughout the province. Duties of this personnel in the unit included the execution of court orders, serving of legal documents and the enforcement of statute orders. The Registrar of Courts provided advice and support to Local Registrars around the province. The Court Operations Unit administered the Court of Appeal, Court of Queen's Bench, Surrogate Court, Unified Family Court and the Automatic Enforcement of Maintenance Orders program. It also provided non-judicial administration of the Provincial Court of Saskatchewan and the Traffic Safety Court of Saskatchewan. Acts administered by the Unit included The Commissioner for Oaths Act, The Notaries Public Act and The Marriage Act. The unit also oversaw thetraining and support services for the province's Justices of the Peace. The Administrative Support Unit provided financial and administrative support for the branch. In addition, it was responsible for the Provincial Court Management Information System. By 1990 a fifth unit, the Maintenance Enforcement Office, was added. The Office assisted recipients of court-ordered maintenance with the enforcement of their orders.

The Corrections Branch was organized into two sub-branches: Institutional Operations and Community Operations. The Institutional Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of facilities and programs for the custody and care of adult offenders sentenced to terms of less than two years. Provincial correctional centres were located at Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert (all for male offenders) and at the Pine Grove (Women's) Centre in Prince Albert. The branch also operated a community correctional centre at North Battleford for offenders serving terms of less than four months. The division's northern region administered a small community correctional centre at Buffalo Narrows for low to medium-risk offenders residing in the far north of the province. Programs offered to offenders while in custody included: vocational and academic training; group activities and recreation; medical and dental services; counselling; and family therapy. Parole services were coordinated by the institutions in cooperation with the National Parole Board. Five community training residences offered residence and rehabilitation opportunities for low-risk offenders and probationers through employment, academic and vocational training, counselling, and addictions treatment. Nine correctional camps were located primarily at provincial parks throughout the province where low-risk offenders lived and worked while serving their terms. Administrative Release Programs included the Work Incentive, Conditional Release and Institutional Fine Option programs.

The Community Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of programs and services aimed at protecting society while providing probation and rehabilitation opportunities to offenders outside the confines of a correctional facility. Probation programs and services were delivered primarily by probation officers staffed at regional offices throughout the province. The two key functions of probation officers were to prepare pre-sentence reports and to supervise offenders on probation. Other community-based corrections programs administered by the branch included the Fine Option Program, Community Service Order Program, Bail Verification and Supervision Program, the Restitution Program, Volunteers in Probation program and the Impaired Driver's Treatment Program.

The Property Management Branch administered the systems of registration for real property (the Land Titles System) and personal property (the Personal Property Registry). The director of the branch also held the office of Master of Titles. The Land Titles System included the examination and registry of land-related documents, and the issuance and of titles. A network of land titles offices throughout the province responded to title enquiries and registration submissions. The Chief Surveyor examined and approved the registrations made from these offices. The Personal Property Registry provided a notice filing system wherein a secured party could register a financing statement expressing an interest in the personal property of a debtor. It also provided an enquiry system for individuals intending on purchasing personal property to search and request information related to the property.

The Corrections and Justice Services Division of the Department of Justice was discontinued in 1991 as a result of a departmental reorganization. Responsibility for corrections was transferred to the department's newly-established Solicitor General Division, while court services and property registry were transferred to the newly-established Registry Services Division.

Name of creator

(1991-1993)

Administrative history

The Solicitor General Division of the Department of Justice was established in January 1991. The division assumed responsibility for policing services, firearms control and the coroners' office from the department's Administration Division and corrections services from the Corrections and Justice Services Division. It was organized into the branches of Policing, Community Operations and Institutional Operations. Responsibility for the division was held by an Assistant Deputy Minister, Terry Thompson, who reported to the department's Deputy Minister.

The Policing Branch was responsible for provincial policing services, administration of the federal Firearms Control Program, the Chief Coroner's office and its network of coroners throughout the province, and the licensing of private investigators and security guards. It negotiated and administered
contracts with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) for police services delivered from 115 detachments in the province. It also oversaw the Aboriginal Constable Program which provided RCMP services to First Nations communities.

The Community Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of corrections programs and services aimed at protecting society while providing probation and alternative rehabilitation measures to offenders outside the confines of a correctional facility. Probation programs and services were
delivered primarily by probation officers staffed at regional offices throughout the province. The two key functions of probation officers were to prepare pre-sentence reports and to supervise offenders on probation. Other community-based corrections programs administered by the branch included: the Intensive Probation Supervision / Electronic Monitoring Program; Intensive Community Program; Fine Option Program; Community Service Order Program; Bail Verification and Supervision Program; the Restitution Program; Volunteers in Probation; program and the Impaired Driver's Treatment Program.

The Institutional Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of corrections facilities and programs for the custody and care of adult offenders sentenced to terms of less than two years. Provincial correctional centres were located at Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert (all for male offenders) and at the Pine Grove (Women's) Centre in Prince Albert. The branch also operated a community correctional centre at North Battleford for offenders serving terms of less than four months. The division's northern region administered a small community correctional centre at Buffalo Narrows for low to medium-risk offenders residing in the far north of the province. Programs offered to offenders while in custody included: vocational and academic training; group activities and recreation; medical and dental services; counselling; and family therapy. Parole services were coordinated by the institutions in cooperation with the National Parole Board. Community training residences offered residence and rehabilitation opportunities for low-risk offenders and probationers through employment, academic and vocational training, counselling, and addictions treatment. Correctional camps were located primarily at provincial parks throughout the province where low-risk offenders lived and worked while serving their terms. Administrative Release Programs included the Work Incentive, Conditional Release and Institutional Fine Option programs.

The Solicitor General Division of the Department of Justice was discontinued in 1993 as a result of a departmental reorganization. Responsibility for corrections was transferred to the department's newly-established Corrections Division, while all other responsibilities were transferred to the newly-established Policing and Security Services Division.

Name of creator

(1993-2002)

Administrative history

The Corrections Division of the Department of Justice was established in 1993 as part of a departmental reorganization. It assumed the responsibilities for corrections services and programs from the former Solicitor General Division. The division was responsible for the administration of correctional institutions in Saskatchewan, and for the provision of adult corrections programs and services. At its establishment, the division was organized into two branches: the Institutional Operations Branch and the Community Operations Branch. A third branch, Community Facilities Branch, was added in 2001. The division reported to the department's Deputy Minister.

The Community Operations Branch was responsible for the administration of corrections programs and services aimed at protecting society while providing offenders with pre-trial, sentencing and probation alternatives in the community. Probation programs and services were delivered primarily by probation officers staffed at regional offices and sub-offices throughout the province. Community-based corrections programs administered by the branch included: the Intensive Probation Supervision / Electronic Monitoring Program; Intensive Community Program; Fine Option Program; Community Service Order Program; Bail Supervision Program; the Restitution Program; and the Impaired Driver's Treatment Program.

The Institutional Operations Branch was responsiblefor the administration of corrections facilities and programs for the custody and care of adult offenders sentenced to terms of less than two years. Provincial correctional centres were located at Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert (all for male offenders) and at the Pine Grove (Women's) Centre in Prince Albert. The branch also operated a community correctional centre at North Battleford for offenders serving terms of less than four months. The division's northern region administered a small community correctional centre at Buffalo Narrows for low to medium-risk offenders residing in the far north of the province. Programs offered to offenders while in custody included: vocational and academic training; group activities and recreation; medical and dental services; counselling; and family therapy. Correctional camps were located primarily at provincial parks throughout the province where low-risk offenders lived and worked while serving their terms. Community training residences offered residence and rehabilitation opportunities for low-risk offenders and probationers through employment, academic and vocational training, counselling, and addictions treatment. As well, the branch held contracts with private agencies for a small number of community residence placements. In 2001, responsibility for the administration of the community training residence program was transferred to the newly-established Community Facilities Branch.

The Corrections Division of the Department of Justice was discontinued in April 2002. Responsibility for corrections was transferred to the Adult Corrections Division of the Department of Corrections and Public Safety.

Custodial history

The Department of Northern Saskatchewan transferred some of these records to the Saskatoon office, Saskatchewan Archives in six accessions between 1978 and 1982: S78-67 (July 11, 1978); S79-45 (May 3, 1979); S81-15 (February 2, 1981); S81-135 (July 28, 1981); S81-202 (December 3, 1981); and S82-199 (August 23, 1982).

The Saskatchewan Department of Social Services transferred some of these records to the Saskatoon office, Saskatchewan Archives in four accessions between 1984 and 1985: S84-11 (January 12, 1984); S84-21 (January 25, 1984); S84-88 (May 23, 1984); and S85-47 (February 19, 1985).

The Saskatchewan Department of Social Services transferred some of these records from its regional offices in 14 accessions between 1988 and 1990: R1988-112 (April 11, 1988); R1988-195 (June 28, 1988); R1988-205 (July 6, 1988); R1988-238 (August 2, 1988); R1988-240 (August 2, 1988); R1988-341 (October 24, 1988); R1989-034 (February 7, 1989); R1989-072 (March 22, 1989); R1989-073 (March 27, 1989); R1989-231 (May 17, 1989); R1989-244 (May 31, 1989); R1989-248 (June 14, 1989); R1990-013 (January 17, 1990); and R1990-120 (May 4, 1990).

The Saskatchewan Department of Justice transferred some of these records from its regional offices in 44 accessions between 1988 and 2000: R1988-139 (April 29, 1988); R1989-007 (January 9, 1989); R1989-021 (January 25, 1989); R1990-138 (May 29, 1990); R1990-164 (July 6, 1990); R1990-224 (August 23, 1990); R1990-225 (August 22, 1990); R1990-226 (August 22, 1990); R1990-234 (August 29, 1990); R1990-247 (September 12, 1990); R1991-022 (February 15, 1991); R1991-030 (March 8, 1991); R1991-037 (March 20, 1991); R1991-173 (May 31, 1991); R1991-177 (June 6, 1991); R1991-178 (June 17, 1991); R1991-249 (September 11, 1991); R1992-268 (July 27, 1992); R1992-359 (February 11, 1992); R1998-129 (February 17, 1998); R1998-146 (March 13, 1998); R1998-157 (April 14, 1998); R1998-181 (May 8, 1998); R1998-195 (May 29, 1998); R1998-196 (May 29, 1998); R1998-199 (June 4, 1998); R1998-205 (June 17, 1998); R1998-208 (June 19, 1998); R1998-240 (August 10, 1998); R1998-261 (September 1, 1998); R1999-025
(February 11, 1999); R1999-026 (February 15, 1999); R1999-031 (February 23, 1999); R1999-161 (March 31, 1999); R1999-163 (April 1, 1999); R1999-183 (April 28, 1999); R1999-184 (April 28, 1999); R1999-186 (May 5, 1999); R1999-193 (May 17, 1999); R1999-237 (July 20, 1999); R1999-272 (September 8, 1999); R1999-278 (September 20, 1999); R2000-062 (March 21, 2000); and R2000-446 (December 18, 2000).

The Saskatchewan Department of Corrections and Public Safety transferred some of these records from its regional offices in 16 accessions between 2003 and 2006: R2003-226 (July 10, 2003); R2003-229 (July 11, 2003); R2003-238 (July 22, 2003); R2003-239 (July 22, 2003); R2003-251 (August 11, 2003); R2003-269 (September 18, 2003); R2003-296 (November 3, 2003); R2004-170 (April 14, 2004); R2004-171 (April 14, 2004); R2004-190 (April 28, 2004); R2004-265 (August 25, 2004); R2004-285 (October 1, 2004); R2004-293 (October 12, 2004); R2004-329 (2004); R2005-228 (May 26, 2005); and R2006-025 (February 7, 2006).

Scope and content

This series consists of records created, accumulated and used by the Saskatchewan Department of Welfare (1966-1972); Department of Social Services (1972-1983); Department of Northern Saskatchewan (1973-1981) and Department of Justice (1983-2000) in the administration of adult probation cases. The case files were maintained by probation officers within a network of regional offices throughout the province. In addition to case files from the standard probation program, the series includes case files of probationers enlisted in the Restitution; Impaired Drivers' Treatment; Bail Verification and Supervision; and Community Service Order programs.

No sub-series have been identified in this series.

The types of records in this series include: probation orders; intake forms; contact summary sheets; requests for pre-sentence reports; pre-sentence reports; criminal history reports from the Canadian Police Information Centre; offender classification profiles; risk assessment reports; anecdotal progress reports; attendance centre reports; review panel reports; applications to alter probation orders; closure sheets; memoranda and correspondence.

Notes area

Physical condition

Records are in good physical condition.

Immediate source of acquisition

Arrangement

Original order maintained by archivist.

Language of material

Script of material

Location of originals

Availability of other formats

Restrictions on access

These records are subject to access restrictions. Please consult reference archivist for assistance.

Terms governing use, reproduction, and publication

Use, publication and/or reproduction are subject to Crown Copyright. Please consult reference archivist for assistance.

Finding aids

SAFA 673 consists of a series description. Probation case file lists are subject to access restrictions.

Associated materials

Related materials

Accruals

Further accruals are expected.

General note

To consult the records, visit or contact the Regina office.

General note

This series represents a sample of records retained by the government agencies responsible for the records in compliance with records retention and disposal schedules.

Conservation

Conservation practices in place at the time of processing were applied to the records in this series.

Location note

Location for retrieval: Regina - Hillsdale; Regina - Maxwell.

Alpha-numeric designations

Textual Records: Old guide GR 305 (R-1798); R-1324; R-1393; R-1395; R-1446.1; R-1450.1; R-1527.1; R-1557.1; R-1564.1; R-1564.2; R-1564.3; R-1564.4; R-1564.5; R-1564.6; R-1718; R-1719; R-1793; R-1794; R-1795; R-1798.

Alternative identifier(s)

Standard number area

Standard number

Access points

Subject access points

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Control area

Accession area