Archief Fonds 56 - C.J. Mackenzie fonds

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C.J. Mackenzie fonds

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Fonds 56

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  • 1910-1930, predominant 1920-1930 (Vervaardig)

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76.2 cm of textual records

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Chalmers Jack Mackenzie, the first Dean of the U of S College of Engineering, rose to national and international prominence as the man who guided Canada's atomic research during World War II. Mackenzie, who came to be known as the dean of Canadian scientists and was once described as "contributing more to the advancement of science and learning, and to the welfare of Canada through science, than any other living Canadian," was born 10 July 1888 in St. Stephen, New Brunswick. He graduated in engineering from Dalhousie University in 1909, and first joined the University of Saskatchewan in 1912 as a sessional lecturer in civil engineering. He earned his MSc. in Engineering from Harvard in 1915. During World War I he served with the 54th Battalion CEF. Mackenzie returned to the U of S as a Professor; in 1921, when the School of Engineering became a College, he was appointed Dean. Mackenzie left the U of S in 1939 to join the National Research Council. He stepped down as president of the NRC in 1952, accepting the post of president of the newly formed Atomic Energy of Canada, where he stayed for one year. In 1963 he was appointed Special Advisor to the Government of Canada on the organization of government scientific activities. Mackenzie was awarded 20 honourary degrees, from Canada, the United States, Europe, and Africa. In 1975 the College of Engineering established the C.J. Mackenzie Chair in his honour. Dr. Mackenzie died on 26 February 1984 at the age of 95.

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This fonds contains several files relating to early town planning in Western Canada, including Calgary, Camrose, Lacombe, Magrath, and Wainright, Alberta; Churchill, Manitoba; and Kindersley, Moose Jaw, Saskatoon, and Yorkton, Saskatchewan. It also includes a miscellaneous file of speeches and addresses, correspondence regarding Mackenzie's military career, and a file on the Canadian Institute of International Affairs.

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