Fonds fonds 172 - Amateur Radio Club

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Amateur Radio Club

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Fonds

Reference code

fonds 172

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Statement of scale (cartographic)

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Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

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Date(s)

  • 1964-1989. (Creation)

Physical description area

Physical description

.6 m of contact confirmation cards

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Administrative history

The Amateur Radio Club, later called VE5US, was formed during the 1956-57 academic year. The Club gave members lessons on Morse code and basic theory which could be used toward obtaining government certification to broadcast on-air. The Club operated a well-equipped station atop the Engineering Building. On a weekly basis it would communicate with other universities across the country at a set time, allowing students and their families to communicate for free. Over time, the club expanded its reach to many places across the globe. The rising popularity of the Internet eventually led to the end of the club.

Custodial history

Scope and content

The fonds contains contact confirmation cards collected by the club over the decades of operation. QSL cards are, perhaps, the most visible aspect of this hobby. The radio operator would send a 'confirmation of reception' (or 'QSL' in the ham's Q-code) to a listener who had proof of reception time, date and frequency as well as information on the quality of the signal received. They are proof that a shortwave radio station was heard.

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No restrictions.

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yes

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